Mosquito Magnet Review: Does It Really Work?

The Mosquito Magnet is essentially a mosquito trap attached to a propane tank, which attracts  mosquitoes…well, like a magnet. 

This magnet attracts mosquitoes and then catches them in a mild vacuum where they are sucked into a metal screened net. Within 24 hours, they become dehydrated and die.

Reviews of Mosquito Magnet

Pros and Cons

The mosquito magnet is a promising option for not using chemicals or insecticides. The mechanism of  Mosquito Magnet is simple, laying a fool-proof trap for mosquitoes and leaving them caged to die.

The only “ingredient” used is “propane”. Propane doesn’t do any harm to humans or pets.

“The earlier models of Mosquito Magnet which were the Defender, Liberty and Pro created their fair share of poor reviews due to the clogs between the propane tank and trap connection causing the Mosquito Magnet to not work. Fortunately, the company that makes the Mosquito Magnet responded and the newer models have not been plagued by this issue.” 

Mosquito Magnet: Executive

The Executive model is a cordless Mosquito Magnet trap which covers an area of 1 Acre and is used outdoors.

It comes with an LCD panel and 5 operating modes. It also features less power consumption technology.

It works to attract and capture mosquitoes and other biting insects by using its patented catalytic converter, which convert propane to carbon dioxide to simulate human breath.

Mosquito Magnet: Independence

The Independence model is another cordless trap which covers the same area as the Executive. However, it lacks some of the Executive’s features such as an LCD panel, operation modes, and less power consumption technology. 

The Independence runs on 4 C batteries which are included.

As with other Mosquito Magnet models, it is silent, odorless, and features a dual-color design proven to attract more mosquitoes.

Mosquito Magnet: Patriot Plus

The Mosquito Magnet Patriot Plus is a corded option with a 50 foot power cord. While still effective at trapping mosquitoes, it doesn’t come with features like an LCD panel or different modes of operation. It also covers an area of 1 acre and is for outdoor use only. 

 

Why The Mosquito Magnet Works

Did you ever imagine how these little bloodsucker mosquitoes came to know about your presence?

Don’t worry we have an explanation for this and how the Mosquito Magnet attracts mosquitoes towards it.

Female mosquitoes need blood to breed therefore they fly 25 feet or less off the ground and search for humans using their array of sensory organs.

These sensory organs and their role are:

  • Antennae
    It detects the carbon dioxide released from human lungs from distances up to 100 feet away and other chemicals.
  • Maxillary Palp
    It is located between the antennae and detects the odor of octanol and other chemicals released from human sweat.

These two organs help mosquitoes to find you and give you a quick bite. Cleverly, the Mosquito Magnet uses the two chemicals below to emulate human breath and sweat.

  • Propane
    The safe catalytic process taking place in the Mosquito Magnet converts propane into carbon dioxide which helps in fooling the mosquitoes into thinking they have found a human target. 
  • Octenol
    The additional attractant which drives mosquitos away from you and sends them into the trap where they are vacuumed into the bug bag and in 24 hours they die due to dehydration.

About Manufacturer

Mosquito Magnet, is a leading pest product company that engineers long-term pest solutions that are scientifically proven to reduce mosquitoes.

They are the first company to sell commercial carbon dioxide emulating traps.

Awards:
The Mosquito Magnet was rated “Top Choice” for efficacy and ease of use by America’s leading consumer testing magazine.

Here's What Buyers Have To Say

Going through reviews published on different sites online, we see many consumers reporting that the product is overpriced. Many reviewers note that even though the Mosquito Magnet works perfectly, they have found other products that also work but for a smaller cost.

Others have reported that their Mosquito Magnet product went into fault mode just after crossing the 1 year mark.

However, many of the negative reviews were of Mosquito Magnet’s early products. It seems that they have since worked out the “bugs” (sorry, we couldn’t resist) in their new models.

There are also plenty of buyers who are extremely happy with the product. Not only do they say how well the machine works, but they say how happy they are to be able to get rid of mosquitoes in their yard without using toxic chemicals.

One reviewer from the southern part of the United States noted that users might need to use Lurex3 as an additional attractant instead of Octenol – due to the variation in southern mosquitoes.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

No, it has to be purchased separately. It doesn’t come with any of the models listed above.

Yes, unlike spray repellents, it works without any issues in wet conditions.

No, they don’t attract bees at all. They work best on mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects like black flies.

How To Assemble Mosquito Misting System?

Choose, decide, and buy the Mosquito Magnet that is best for your needs.

Assemble the Mosquito Magnet by placing the U-Shape support legs into the slots on the base.

Turn the base assembly right side up.

Now place the support pole into the cavity on the base.

Put the trap powerhead on the pole and press it until it is firmly fixed.

Powerhead and legs should face the same direction.

Place the propane canister on the base.

Now, place the assembled Mosquito Magnet to the desired place.

Remove the foil and put the attractant in the plume tube carefully.

Attach the propane regulator hose to the propane canister and secure it tightly.

Plug the power connector to the power head and plug the AC adapter to an electrical socket.

Slowly open the propane valve.

Turn on the switch and you will see the red LED blinking indicating that it is being warm up.

After 20 minutes, it should be a solid green and has already started hunting mosquitoes.

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